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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY


CLASS OF 1979


Classmates In Print




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Article -- June 1, 2021

Lawrence Tsai -- PAW Article: All in the Family - Alumni Wineries
Nature took its toll, but alumni wineries adapted. This article, which describes how alumni owned wineries survived through the California fires, includes Larry and MaryAnn Tsai's Moone-Tsai Vineyards.

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Entered: July 26, 2022

Article -- October 1, 2020

Richard Pildes -- PAW Article: Making it Count: Thoughts on voting during a pandemic
Rick Pildes ’79, a constitutional law professor at New York University, is a leading scholar of election law and legal issues affecting democracy. He is also appearing regularly on CNN as an expert on voting and elections throughout the fall.

Pildes spoke with PAW’s senior writer, Mark F. Bernstein ’83, about possible legal challenges to the upcoming election and how to prevent them. Later, PAW spoke again with Pildes about Barton Gellman ’82’s Atlantic article, “The Election That Could Break America.”

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Entered: July 26, 2022

Article -- July 1, 2021

Damian Fernandez -- PAW Article: What's Next for Higher Ed?
DURING THE PAST YEAR, THE COVID-19 pandemic has cost the nation’s colleges and universities an estimated $120 billion, according to the American Council on Education. Postsecondary institutions had to shoulder the expense of quickly adding technology to switch to remote education for nearly all students while simultaneously seeing a collective decline of approximately 560,000 undergraduates, causing significant drops in tuition revenue for some colleges and universities. And, once it was safer to bring students back to campuses, colleges had to ensure that policies and practices were in place to deter the spread of coronavirus infections in their communities.

Classmate Damian Fernandez, president of Eckerd College, a liberal-arts school in St. Petersburg, Florida, is quoted along with other alumni leaders.

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Entered: July 26, 2022

Book -- October 6, 2020

Stephen Davis -- Undercurrents: Channeling Outrage to Spark Practical Activism
Undercurrents: Channeling Outrage to Spark Practical Activism brings the perspective of experienced global social innovation leader, scholar and speaker, Steve Davis, to bear on some of the most powerful and helpful macrotrends rippling through society today.

The book teaches readers how to harness their outrage and capitalize on global trends to instigate and encourage change across the world. The author identifies five global undercurrents with outsized importance that are shaping our world:

Global economies are moving away from the old pyramid model into a diamond, bringing powerful new possibilities for human well-being;
Communities are becoming the customer – rather than passive beneficiaries - as social change is increasingly led by local voices and activists;
Equity is leveling and reshaping the field of social change and activism;
Digital disruption, through the power of data and digital tools, impacts almost everything; and
The middle of the journey to social change is becoming surprisingly sexy, as we focus on adapting innovation for widespread impact at scale.

The book’s lessons are supported throughout by stories, experiences, data and observations from across the globe. Undercurrents is perfect for activists and leaders of all kinds who aim to increase their impact on their organizations and the world at large, as well as the intellectually curious who hope to increase their understanding of the changing world around them.

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Entered: July 26, 2022

Article -- March 1, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Black And White And The Blues: Who Profits from a Cultural Tradition?
PAW Cover Story: No genre of American music has been more romanticized than the blues. As with most things that are romanticized, though, the treatment elides and airbrushes many inconvenient truths.

To pick from dozens of arresting examples in Whose Blues? Facing Up to Race and the Future of the Music (University of North Carolina Press), a new book by Adam Gussow ’79 *00, even in its heyday during the Great Migration of the 1920s and ’30s, the rawest Deep South blues artists — guitarists like Charley Patton and Son House — received much less favor from the Black record-buying public, North and South, than did Bessie Smith, Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, and other female blues queens who fronted jazzier, horn-driven ensembles.

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Entered: July 24, 2022

Newsletter -- July 7, 2022

Adam Gussow -- Sir Rod and the Blues Doctors On Tour
The band vehicle is loaded; lots of copies of the new CD are in hand. Alan is waiting by the side of the road, literally, for his pickup this morning. Time to go! We'll see you soon. Open to see a list of dates/locations.

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Entered: July 7, 2022

Opinion -- June 23, 2022

Robert Ehrlich -- The Script Has Flipped on the Left's Favorite Charge Against Conservatives
Not so long ago, “mean” was a charge made exclusively by the left and targeted at will at any and all conservatives/GOPers. The indictment was generally effective, as it would place tax- and budget-cutting Republicans instantly on defense. After all, unlike socialism, capitalism does not promise a chicken in every pot and in fact recognizes there will be losers in the competitive marketplace.

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Entered: June 23, 2022

Article -- May 1, 2022

Chad Edwards -- Bringing Space Exploration to Life
Edwards, a physicist, leads NASA projects on Mars

As hard as it is to get a spacecraft to Mars, Chad Edwards ’79 and his team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in Pasadena, California, have perhaps an even harder job: to think about future missions and imagine what technologies will be needed to make them successful.

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Entered: June 8, 2022

Opinion -- June 3, 2022

Robert Ehrlich -- Our Country Has Gone Off the Rails and Democrats Could Make Things Even Worse

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Entered: June 3, 2022

Article -- May 29, 2022

Lawrence Studnicky -- The High Plains Drifters tell all re: “The One That Got Away” lyric video and more
From New York City to outer space and beyond, The High Plains Drifters explore bold musical territory on every new song and video release. Following their official music video for “The One That Got Away”, the band have now shared a lyric video to accompany the song. VENTS recently had the pleasure of interviewing frontman Larry Studnicky and producer Greg Cohen, which can be read below.

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Entered: May 29, 2022

Article -- February 7, 2022

Margaret Russell -- Black women in the legal profession reflect on how long it's taken to get this far
As President Biden is set to fulfill his promise to nominate a Black woman justice to the Supreme Court, Black women in the legal profession talk about the significance of the moment - an NPR interview

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Entered: May 29, 2022

Book -- September 5, 2022

Stephen Mormoris -- The Oculus
Poems of muscular power that reveal the rich vistas that surround us all, in which the humble objects of everyday life become divine, while the divine is humbled and humanized.

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Entered: May 29, 2022

Book -- May 29, 2022

Constance Hale Ganahl -- Sin and Syntax: How to Craft Wicked Good Prose
Today's writers need more spunk than Strunk: whether it's the Great American e-mail, Madison Avenue advertising, or Grammy Award-winning rap lyrics, memorable writing must jump off the page. Copy veteran Constance Hale is on a mission to make creative communication, both the lyrical and the unlawful, an option for everyone.

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Entered: May 29, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Always Something Campaign Delegitimize Donald Trump

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Leftists Not Conservatives Act Dont Get Way

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Deplorables Media Cant Even Fathom

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Liberals Conservatives Must Fight Lefts War Free Speech

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Just Far Left Democrats Willing Go

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Just Ok Isnt Good Enough Anymore Border Security

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Democratic Partys Aspirations Dont Match American People

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Lefts Views Wealth Equality Arent Compassion Envy

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Fox News Opponent Left Cant Beat

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Thanks Taking Stand Free Speech Campus Mr President

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Amtrack Joe Falling Behind Dems Race Left

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 6 Lefts Bogus Claims Actually Triggering

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Deplorables Vs Progressives Version America Will Win

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Still Hope Race Relations America

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Socialism Dummies

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Presidential Rhetorical Playbook Circa 2019

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Left Killing Comedy

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Trump Making High Stakes Foreign Policy Plays Like No President

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Murderers Row Lineup Set Destroying Donald Trump 2020

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Medias Anti Trump Obsession Could Backfire In 2020

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Acting

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Go

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Common Thread Reagan Trump

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Cant Back Fight Voter Integrity

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Guide Understanding Language Left

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Five Things Left Refuses Get

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Excuses Democrats Impeach Trump

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Opposition Trump Rooted Anger

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Democrats Lurch Left Unprecedented

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Polls Wont Tell Whole Story 2020

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- No Moderate Democratic Presidential Candidates

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Six Takeaways Trump Presidency Four Years

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Biden Presidency Send America Back Obama Years

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Bidens Aint Black Comment Wasnt Mistake Believes

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 2020 Predictions Democrats Media Overplaying Hand

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Real Joe

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Years Mainstream Media Misreporting Babylon Bee Three Perfect Words Sum

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Average Americans May Not Wear Maga Hats Clear Vote

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Favorite Pollster Boosted Trumps Chances 10

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 12 Warnings Trump Supporters Biden Survives Courts Recounts

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Political Predictions Rarely Come True 1 Can Take Bank

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- One Insightful Replies Nevertrumper Ever Sent

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- No Idea Literally Dems Take Rules Thee Not

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Biden Said Ditch America First 1 Month Done

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 6 Dangerous Ways Leftists Used Covid Radically Change America

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Media Will Keep Blaming Everything Trump Normal Americans Say Enough

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Gop Trump Haters Finally Realizing Horrible Mistake Made Nov 3

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Got Believe Number Decent College Kids Outweighs Woke Brats

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Professors Begin Course 1 Simple Lecture Turn Great Nation Around

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Bidens Breaking Cardinal Rule Subsidizing Bad Behavior

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 4 Headlines Show Downright Weird State America Today

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Tide Turning Will Rest Nation Follow Texas Lead

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Leftists Say Love Really Mean

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 1 Simple Way Secure Vote Left Will Never Allow

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Can Now See Cost Wokeness Everyday Lives

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- America Beginning Wake Soon See Comeback

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Suffering Biden Reverse Every Trump Decision Especially Successful Ones

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Americas Options Limited China Knows

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Mindlessly Reversing Trumps Policies Caused American Carnage Suffering Though

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Disastrous Practice Cute Half Led 2021 Election Gop Knockout

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 1st Tangible Evidence Big Red Wave Coming Nov 2022

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 2 Clear Motivations Leftist Elites Attacks Working Class Americans

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Three Infuriating Ways Leftist Media Twists Stories

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Gops Transformation Party Working Class Now Complete Democrats Worry

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Generation Burned Big Govt Never Feel Bern

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Now See Biden Power Gruesome Foursome Will Come Knocking

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- Lefts Assault Objective Truth Creating Frightening Situations

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Opinion

Robert Ehrlich -- 9 Things Left Recently Done Transform America Destroy Culture

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Entered: May 27, 2022

Book -- May 31, 2004

Katherine Maguire -- Canarino
Canarino is a portrait of intimate relationships set in a world of privilege and achievement. Its characters possess personal gifts in dazzling abundance, yet their appetites to succeed, to be exceptional, tempt them to risk everything. What is the cost for the heart of seeking perfection?

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- May 13, 2014

Katherine Maguire -- The Animals: Love Letters Between Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy
The English novelist and screenwriter Christopher Isherwood was already famous as the author of Goodbye to Berlin when he met Don Bachardy, a California teenager, on the beach in Santa Monica in 1952. Within a year, they began to live together as an openly gay couple, defying convention in the closeted world of Hollywood. Isherwood was forty-eight; Bachardy was eighteen. The Animals is the testimony in letters to their extraordinary partnership, which lasted until Isherwood's death in 1986—despite the thirty year age gap, affairs and jealousy (on both sides), the pressures of increasing celebrity, and the disdain of twentieth-century America for love between two men.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- January 7, 2007

Katherine Maguire -- What You Will
Gwen, an artist, and Lawrence, an academic, are happily married with a young child and an enviable way of life. When Hilary, Gwen's closest friend, arrives from New York bruised by a broken engagement, a lost job, and a misguided love affair, Gwen is determined to find her someone to marry.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- December 31, 2005

Katherine Maguire -- Leninsky Prospekt
Leninsky Prospekt is the stunning new novel from the author of the critically-acclaimed Canarino. Having fled Communist Russia as a young woman, Nina never dreamt that she would return to her homeland. But having married an American diplomat, she finds herself back in Moscow, tasked with integrating the New York Ballet Corps during their tour of Russia. Ballet is her first love and Nina immerses herself in her new role, seeking to escape old feelings stirred up by her return home. When a shocking discovery forces her to seek help from her old friends, Nina must decide where her allegiances truly lie - a decision that will shake her world to its foundations.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- January 1, 2013

Katherine Maguire -- +1: A Novel
At fifty, Alice Gregory discovers that she can’t really see anymore. So she buys a pair of drugstore reading glasses, strength +1, and her suburban life looks magically more inviting. Outside the circle of marriage and family, shrinking as her three sons grow up and leave home, fresh vistas open. The illness of a new friend, an encounter with a recently divorced childhood companion, and her rekindled ambition to have a career bring unexpected excitement and responsibility.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- January 29, 1997

Katherine Maguire -- Diaries: Volume 1, 1939-1960 (Christopher Isherwood Diaries)
The previously unpublished diaries of the twentieth-century novelist follow his emigration from Germany as World War II began, his social life in Hollywood, his homosexual affairs, and his relationships with famous literati.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- June 13, 1994

Katherine Maguire -- Juvenilia: Poems 1922-1928 (W.H. Auden: Critical Editions)
Regardless of how poets feel about their youthful attempts at verse, their early poems not only enrich our understanding of their artistic growth, but also reveal much about the nature of literary genius. No other twentieth-century poet has left behind such a wealth of early poetry as did W. H. Auden. By bringing together for the first time all the poems written by Auden between the ages of fifteen and twenty-one (1922-1928), this book allows us a rare, detailed look at the literary personality, development, and preoccupations of a major poet. Auden's readers will be fascinated to find in these poems the earliest evidence of his interest in psychoanalysis, his conflicted attitude toward his homosexuality, his self-conscious approach to poetry, and his life-long journey toward a religious sense of the world.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- January 29, 1997

Katherine Maguire -- "In Solitude, for Company": W. H. Auden after 1940: Unpublished Prose and Recent Criticism (Auden Studies, 3)
The third volume of Auden Studies focuses on the later career of this major poet and intellectual, and includes a great deal of previously unpublished prose by him, as well as a selection from his letters. The writings demonstrate the scope of his intellect, which ranged easily from
psychoanalysis to theology, archaeology to politics. Each piece is annotated and introduced by an Auden specialist, several of whom also contribute to a symposium, included here, on Auden's great poem "In Praise of Limestone."

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- December 27, 1990

Katherine Maguire -- "The Map of All My Youth": Early Works, Friends, and Influences (Auden Studies, 1)
This is the first volume in a new series on the work of poet W.H. Auden. It includes a large amount of unpublished material by Auden, notably six poems written in German in the early 1930s, translated by the poet and David Constantine, and the complete version of his important early essay,
"Writing," with a new foreword by its original editor, Naomi Mitchinson. Substantial selections from Auden's letters to Stephen Spender, E.R. Dodds, and Mrs. Dodds are presented with full annotation. Including essays about Auden, his mentors, and contemporaries by leading scholars in the field, and
advice on collecting Auden's works, Auden Studies is indispensable for students, bibliophiles, and general readers interested in the great poet and his fellow writers.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- November 20, 2012

Katherine Maguire -- Liberation: Diaries: 1970-1983
Candid and revealing, the final volume of Christopher Isherwood's diaries brings together his thoughts on life, love, and death. Beginning in the period of his life when he wrote Kathleen and Frank, his first intensely personal book, Liberation: Diaries 1970–1983 intimately and wittily records Isherwood's immersion in the 1970s art scene in Los Angeles, New York, and London—a world peopled by the likes of Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and David Hockney, as well as his Broadway writing career, which brought him in touch with John Huston, Merchant and Ivory, John Travolta, John Voight, Elton John, David Bowie, Joan Didion, and Armistead Maupin. With a preface by Edmund White, Liberation is a rich and engaging final memoir by one of the most celebrated writers of his generation.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- February 2, 1995

Katherine Maguire -- W.H. Auden: ‘The Language of Learning and the Language of Love.’’ Uncollected Writings, New Interpretations.
The second volume in the highly acclaimed Auden Studies series, The Language of Learning and the Language of Love considers Auden primarily during the first decade of his literary career as a public figure as well as private man. It includes previously unpublished poems, prose, and letters by Auden--each with a scholarly introduction and full annotation--which reveal how the well-known poet, teacher, dramatist, and sage battled with his literary ancestors, experienced love, and devised a rhetoric to express both homosexual feelings and artistic impulses.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- December 6, 2011

Katherine Maguire -- The Sixties: Diaries 1960-1969
The second volume of acclaimed author Christopher Isherwood’s diaries takes readers to the heart of the 1960s, the decade in which Isherwood’s semiautobiographical novel Goodbye to Berlin would be adapted into the Tony Award-winning musical Cabaret. Against a background of cultural paradigm shifts including the advent of space travel, pop art, and mod fashion, and seminal events like the Kennedy/Nixon election, the Marianne Faithfull/Mick Jagger romance, the rise of the Hippie movement, and the riotous explosion of America’s inner cities, The Sixties follows Isherwood’s friendships with creative powerhouses such as Francis Bacon, David Hockney, Richard Burton, and Gore Vidal, and continues the saga of his great romance with portraitist Don Bachardy.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- September 1, 2000

Katherine Maguire -- Lost Years: A Memoir 1945 - 1951
The late author of Goodbye to Berlin describes his "lost years" in postwar Santa Monica, New York, and London, a time spent in frantic socializing, increasing dissipation, and debilitating anxiety and despair.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Book -- January 19, 2021

Billy Aronson -- Funny Shorts
This collection includes 15 comic one-acts: REUNIONS, THE NEWS, LITTLE DUCK, IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, NIGHT RULES, LIGHT YEARS, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD, NEGOTIATION, GUILT, BLEEP THIS BLEEP, OF TWO MINDS, BEATLES FOREVER, AT THE BEACH, FREE WILL, and COMPLETE UNKNOWNS.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Article -- April 16, 2020

Billy Aronson -- Theatre In The Time Of The Pandemic
Moving from big stages to little screens, artists reflect on what really matters

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Video/Film -- June 24, 2020

Billy Aronson -- Negotiation
Written by Billy Aronson. Paul Lieber (as Employer) and Christopher McCann (as Freelancer).
Directed by Evan Handler.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Video/Film -- June 24, 2020

Billy Aronson -- Complete Unknowns
Written by Billy Aronson. Ellen McLaughlin (as Molly), Ellen Maraneck (as Ellen). Directed by James Carpenter

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Video/Film -- September 24, 2018

Billy Aronson -- Summertime
Jamming with pianist Jake Aronson.

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Play/Script -- May 24, 2022

Billy Aronson -- Billy's Plays
This page lists Billy's plays, with short descriptions of each

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Entered: May 24, 2022

Newsletter -- May 19, 2022

Adam Gussow -- Keeping It In The Family
Founded in the winter of 2020, just before the COVID-19 pandemic washed across America and the rest of the world, Sir Rod & the Blues Doctors are a joyous, unlikely ensemble--a three-man brotherhood dedicated to the project of keeping alive the vibrant sounds and spirit of blues master Sterling "Mr. Satan" Magee.

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Entered: May 19, 2022

Newsletter -- May 16, 2022

Adam Gussow -- Honoring Mr. Satan
Friday, May 20, Sir Rod & the Blues Doctors will be playing the second annual Sterling Magee Memorial Birthday Celebration at the North End Taphouse in Gulfport, Florida.

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Entered: May 16, 2022

Newsletter -- April 27, 2022

Adam Gussow -- "Talking Blues Harp" on YouTube
This Friday, Ronnie and his YouTube channel will be hosting us ( Jason Ricci, Liam Ward, Ronnie Shellist, Tomlin Leckie, and me) in a live 60-minute conversation. When we got together several months ago to toss around ideas, we had some outrageous fun. This thing will be loose, free-swinging, and informative.

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Entered: April 28, 2022

Book -- September 11, 2009

Adam Gussow -- Mister Satan's Apprentice: A Blues Memoir
Mister Satan’s Apprentice is the history of one of music’s most fascinating collaborations, between Adam Gussow, a young graduate school dropout and harmonica player, and Sterling “Mr. Satan” Magee, a guitarist and underground blues legend who had originally made his name as “Five Fingers Magee.”

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Entered: April 5, 2022

Newsletter -- April 4, 2022

Adam Gussow -- Come Together - Sir Rod and the Blues Doctors
I've got lots of news to share, but I'm going to keep this email short and sweet on the front end, although it's going to stretch out on the back end. Sir Rod & The Blues Doctors will be releasing a new live album on or about May 20, 2022

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Entered: April 5, 2022

Newsletter -- March 11, 2022

Adam Gussow -- Live on the Hohner YouTube channel
Today I'll be visiting for an hour on the Hohner YouTube channel with fellow Hohner endorser Konstantin Reinfeld. 2 PM Central / 3 PM Eastern / 9 PM Europa. Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHmzSRPsMoU

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Entered: March 11, 2022

Article -- March 4, 2022

Diane Edelman -- Selected Works of Diane Penneys Edelman
A compendium of legal writings by Diane.

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Entered: March 4, 2022

Newsletter -- January 29, 2022

Adam Gussow -- SRBD on tour
Sir Rod & The Blues Doctors, will be touring this summer

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Entered: January 30, 2022

Book -- December 15, 2020

Angel Garcia -- The Kingdom Began in Puerto Rico: Neil Connolly’s Priesthood in the South Bronx
South Bronx, 1958. Change was coming. Guidance was sorely needed to bridge the old and the new, for enunciating and implementing a vision. It was a unique place and time in history where Father Neil Connolly found his true calling and spiritual awakening. The Kingdom Began in Puerto Rico captures the spirit of the era and the spirit of this great man.

Set in historical context of a changing world and a changing Catholic Church, The Kingdom Began in Puerto Rico follows Fr. Neil Connolly’s path through the South Bronx, which began with a special Church program to address the postwar great Puerto Rican migration. After an immersion summer in Puerto Rico, Fr. Neil served the largest concentration of Puerto Ricans in the Bronx from the 1960s to the 1980s as they struggled for a decent life. Through the teachings of Vatican II, Connolly assumed responsibility for creating a new Church and world. In the war against drugs, poverty, and crime, Connolly created a dynamic organization and chapel run by the people and supported Unitas, a nationally unique peer-driven mental health program for youth. Frustrated by the lack of institutional responses to his community’s challenges, Connolly challenged government abandonment and spoke out against ill-conceived public plans. Ultimately, he realized that his priestly mission was in developing new leaders among people, in the Church and the world, and supporting two nationally unique lay leadership programs, the Pastoral Center and People for Change.

Discovering the real mission of priesthood, urban ministry, and the Catholic Church in the United States, author Angel Garcia ably blends the dynamic forces of Church and world that transformed Fr. Connolly as he grew into his vocation. The book presents a rich history of the South Bronx and calls for all urban policies to begin with the people, not for the people. It also affirms the continuing relevance of Vatican II and Medellin for today’s Church and world, in the United States and Latin America.

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Entered: January 18, 2022

Book -- April 6, 2022

Richard Smith -- Not a Soul but Us: Poems
Set in rural England during and after the bubonic plague pandemic of 1348–1349, this verse novel drives to the heart of what we humans are capable of when boiled down to our very core in the struggle to survive—and how, in more ways than one, it’s not our intelligence or our resiliency, but love and the non-human animals that save us.

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Entered: January 18, 2022

Book -- May 11, 2016

Richard Smith -- Green Capitalism. The God that Failed
Smith contends that there is no possible solution to our global ecological crisis within the framework of any conceivable capitalism. The only alternative to market-driven planetary collapse is to transition to a largely planned, mostly publicly-owned economy based on production for need, on democratic governance and rough socio-economic equality, and on contraction and convergence between the global North and South. "Smith brings an impressive command of economics and an engaging conversational style of writing. He explains and illustrates with devastating clarity the key mechanisms of capitalism that force it to grow unendingly ... In the final two chapters, Smith outlines ecological constraints necessary for any post-capitalist economy and describes ecosocialist alternatives to capitalism. The necessary changes are staggering... To that end he outlines a number of attractive and attainable features of an ecosocialist society." David Klein, Director of the climate Science Program at California State University and author of "Capitalism and Climate Change"

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Entered: January 18, 2022

Book -- February 15, 2022

Stephen Riegel -- Finding Judge Crater: A Life and Phenomenal Disappearance in Jazz Age New York
On the night of August 6, 1930, Joseph Force Crater, a newly appointed judge and prominent figure in many circles of Manhattan, hailed a taxi in the heart of Broadway and vanished into thin air. Despite a decades-long international manhunt led by the New York Police Department’s esteemed Missing Persons Bureau, the reason for Crater’s disappearance remains a confounding mystery. In the early months of the investigation, evidence implicated and imperiled New York’s top officials, including then-Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mayor Jimmy Walker, as well as the city’s Tammany Hall political machine, lawyers and judges, and a theater mogul. Drawing on new sources, including NYPD case files and court records, and overlooked evidence discovered years later, Riegel pieces together the puzzle of what likely happened to Joseph Crater and why. To uncover the mystery, he delves into Crater’s ascension into the scintillating and corrupt world of Manhattan in the Roaring Twenties and Jazz Age. In turn, the story of the judge’s vanishing amid the Great Depression unfolds as a harbinger of the disappearance of his lost metropolis and its transformation into modern-day New York City.

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Entered: January 18, 2022

Book -- December 7, 2021

Robert Goldberg -- The Hanged Man's Tale: An Inspector Mazarelle Mystery
In the shadowy back alleys and opulent homes of Paris, hard-nosed police inspector Paul Mazarelle of The Paris Directive sets out on the trail of a serial killer.

A murdered man is discovered dangling inside the tunnels of a Paris canal--the only clue, the tarot card in his pockets: the Hanged Man. When an innocent suspect is railroaded into prison for the homicide, Mazarelle sets off on the hunt for the real killer.

For the charming, hot-tempered, impulsive Frenchman--now back from the provinces and leading his own homicide unit out of Paris’s famed Quai des Orfevres--it’s an investigation that takes him far from the comforts of Beaujolais and bouillabaisse, and plunges him into an underworld of ruthless white supremacists looking for scapegoats in Paris’s growing immigrant community, corrupt cops eager to cover up a shady side business, and a conspiracy of secrets that threaten his own life.

Meanwhile, Claire Girard, an irresistible and ambitious journalist at a popular tabloid, is wrapped up in the same story. On the trail of the Tarot Card killer, Mazarelle finds himself blindsided by their growing attraction. And when his team’s case collides with Girard's latest scoop, and the body count keeps rising, Mazarelle himself becomes a prime suspect who must clear his own name. Gerald Jay’s latest Mazarelle adventure is a riveting, fast-paced thriller about a classic French detective making his way through the dangerous streets of a very modern world.

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Entered: January 18, 2022

Book -- September 30, 2008

John Gartner -- In Search of Bill Clinton: A Psychological Biography
William Jefferson Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States is undoubtedly the greatest American enigma of our age -- a dark horse that captured the White House, fell from grace and was resurrected as an elder statesman whose popularity rises and falls based on the day's sound bytes. John Gartner's In Search of Bill Clinton unravels the mystery at the heart of Clinton's complex nature and why so many people fall under his spell. He tells the story we all thought we knew, from the fresh viewpoint of a psychologist, as he questions the well-crafted Clinton life story. Gartner, a therapist with an expertise in treating individuals with hypomanic temperaments, saw in Clinton the energy, creativity and charisma that leads a hypomanic individual to success as well as the problems with impulse control and judgment, which frequently result in disastrous decision-making. He knew, though, that if he wanted to find the real Bill Clinton he couldn't rely on armchair psychology to provide the answer. He knew he had to travel to Arkansas and around the world to talk with those who knew Clinton and his family intimately. With his boots on the ground, Gartner uncovers long-held secrets about Clinton's mother, the ambitious and seductive Virginia Kelley, her wild life in Hot Springs and the ghostly specter of his biological father, Bill Blythe, to uncover the truth surrounding Clinton's rumor-filled birth. He considers the abusive influence of Clinton's alcoholic stepfather, Roger Clinton, to understand the repeated public abuse he invited both by challenging a hostile Republican Congress and engaging in the clandestine affair with Monica Lewinsky that led to his downfall. Of course, there is no marriage more dissected than that of the Clintons, both in the White House and on the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign trail. Instead of going down familiar paths, Gartner looks at that relationship with a new focus and clearly sees, in Hillary's molding of Clinton into a more disciplined politician, the figure of Bill Clinton's stern grandmother, Edith Cassidy, the woman who set limits on him at an early age. Gartner brings Clinton's story up to date as he travels to Ireland, the scene of one of Clinton's greatest diplomatic triumphs, and to Africa, where his work with AIDS victims is unmatched, to understand Clinton's current humanitarian persona and to find out why he is beloved in so much of the world while still scorned by many at home. John Gartner's exhaustive trip around the globe provides the richest portrait of Clinton yet, a man who is one of our national obsessions. In Search of Bill Clinton is a surprising and compelling book about a man we all thought we knew.

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Entered: January 10, 2022

Book -- January 1, 2005

Terry Silverlight -- The Featured Drummer
A unique method to develop four-way coordination and over-the-barline rhythmic groupings to expand your drumming vocabulary. Especially designed for today's drummer looking to develop polyrhythmic phrasing, Terry Silverlight provides the tools you need to achieve those awkward timings, whatever your musical style. The book is accompanied by two CDs of examples demonstrated especially for you by Silverlight, along with Barry Miles and John Patitucci.

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Book -- March 1, 2006

Terry Silverlight -- The Stick Bag Book of Jazz, Funk and Fusion: Compact Reference Library
The Stick Bag Book of Jazz, Funk & Fusion is the ultimate resource for drummers and musicians. It features the most influential styles, rhythms, and techniques-all in one handy, easy-to-use reference guide. From big band to funk, each rhythm from over 30 classic styles is presented in standard drum notation including fills and performance tips. Whether you are a percussionist, producer, arranger, or songwriter, a strong knowledge of these rhythms will add to your overall versatility as a drummer and musician.

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Book -- August 1, 2006

Terry Silverlight -- Gig Bag Book of Rhythm & Percussion
180+ essential rhythms from around the world in standard drum and percussion notation. Includes tuning and maintenance tips, rudiments, and brush patterns.

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Article -- January 1, 2004

Terry Silverlight -- Electronic Musician Magazine, April 2004 (Vol. 20, No. 5)
Personal Studio-Recording-Production-Sound Design. Features: Terry Silverlight-Wild, Mixing Engineer Pros-Dave Hard Drive Pensado-Tim Palmer-Roger Nichols, Reviews-Ableton Live 3.0-Sony Pictures Sound Forge 7.0a-Yamaha SPX2000-IK Multimedia SampleTank 2 ...

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Music -- October 15, 2021

Terry Silverlight -- In My Own Silver Light (The Music / Video Album)

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Music -- March 16, 2004

Terry Silverlight -- Terry Silverlight

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Music -- January 1, 2004

Terry Silverlight -- Terry Silverlight: Wild

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Music -- August 26, 2011

Terry Silverlight -- Terry Silverlight: In Concert

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- March 7, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Blues Harmonica Workshop: Carlos, Adam, Ronnie, Hank

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- March 21, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Blues Harmonica Jubilee!

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- March 28, 2021

Adam Gussow -- The Blues World in an Uproar

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- April 11, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Blues Harp Webinar + Sir Rod & The Blues Docs LIVE

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- April 29, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Live Blues Harp, Finally!

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- May 10, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Best Blues Book of 2020

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- June 10, 2021

Adam Gussow -- More Live Blues Harp!

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- July 3, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Sir Rod & The Blues Docs On Tour

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- July 24, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Live Blues House Party

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- August 8, 2021

Adam Gussow -- The Art of Comping

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- October 2, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Nashville gig + Gussow's most troubling video ever

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- November 24, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Thanksgiving Blues (Harmonica)

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- December 7, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Free Giveaway - GOLD (rare) Marine Band Harp

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Newsletter -- January 1, 2022

Adam Gussow -- Bluesy New Year!

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Book -- June 18, 2011

John Gartner -- The Hypomanic Edge: The Link Between (A Little) Craziness and (A Lot of) Success in America
Hypomania, a genetically based mild form of mania, endows many of us with unusual energy, creativity, enthusiasm, and a propensity for taking risks. America has an extraordinarily high number of hypomanics—grandiose types who leap on every wacky idea that occurs to them, utterly convinced it will change the world. Market bubbles and ill-considered messianic crusades can be the downside. But there is an enormous upside in terms of spectacular entrepreneurial zeal, drive for innovation, and material success. Americans may have a lot of crazy ideas, but some of them lead to brilliant inventions. Why is America so hypomanic? It is populated primarily by immigrants. This self-selection process is the boldest natural experiment ever conducted. Those who had the will, optimism, and daring to take the leap into the unknown have passed those traits on to their descendants. Bringing his audacious and persuasive thesis to life, Gartner offers case histories of some famous Americans who represent this phenomenon of hypomania. These are the real stories you never learned in school about some of those men who made America: Columbus, who discovered the continent, thought he was the messiah. John Winthrop, who settled and defined it, believed Americans were God’s new chosen people. Alexander Hamilton, the indispensable founder who envisioned America’s economic future, self-destructed because of pride and impulsive behavior. Andrew Carnegie, who began America's industrial revolution, was sure that he was destined personally to speed up human evolution and bring world peace. The Mayer and Selznick families helped create the peculiarly American art form of the Hollywood film, but familial bipolar disorders led to the fall of their empires. Craig Venter decoded the human genome, yet his arrogance made him despised by most of his scientific colleagues, even as he spurred them on to make great discoveries. While these men are extraordinary examples, Gartner argues that many Americans have inherited the genes that have made them the most successful citizens in the world.

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Entered: January 8, 2022

Book -- August 1, 1989

Robert Wright -- Three Scientists and Their Gods: Looking for Meaning in an Age of Information
Examines the concepts of information, meaning, and purpose, describes the function of information at various levels of organization, and discusses the theories of Edward Fredkin, Edward O. Wilson, and Kenneth Blouding

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- August 29, 1995

Robert Wright -- The Moral Animal: Why We Are, the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology
Are men literally born to cheat? Does monogamy actually serve women's interests? These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years. Wright unveils the genetic strategies behind everything from our sexual preferences to our office politics--as well as their implications for our moral codes and public policies. Illustrations.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 9, 2001

Robert Wright -- Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny
In Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny, Wright asserts that, ever since the primordial ooze, life has followed a basic pattern. Organisms and human societies alike have grown more complex by mastering the challenges of internal cooperation. Wright's narrative ranges from fossilized bacteria to vampire bats, from stone-age villages to the World Trade Organization, uncovering such surprises as the benefits of barbarian hordes and the useful stability of feudalism. Here is history endowed with moral significance–a way of looking at our biological and cultural evolution that suggests, refreshingly, that human morality has improved over time, and that our instinct to discover meaning may itself serve a higher purpose. Insightful, witty, profound, Nonzero offers breathtaking implications for what we believe and how we adapt to technology's ongoing transformation of the world.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- May 3, 2010

Robert Wright -- The Evolution of God
In this sweeping narrative that takes us from the Stone Age to the Information Age, Robert Wright unveils an astonishing discovery: there is a hidden pattern that the great monotheistic faiths have followed as they have evolved. Through the prisms of archaeology, theology, and evolutionary psychology, Wright's findings overturn basic assumptions about Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and are sure to cause controversy. He explains why spirituality has a role today, and why science, contrary to conventional wisdom, affirms the validity of the religious quest. And this previously unrecognized evolutionary logic points not toward continued religious extremism, but future harmony.

Nearly a decade in the making, The Evolution of God is a breathtaking re-examination of the past, and a visionary look forward.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- May 8, 2018

Robert Wright -- Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment
From one of America’s most brilliant writers, a New York Times bestselling journey through psychology, philosophy, and lots of meditation to show how Buddhism holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- October 6, 2020

David Michaelis -- Eleanor: A Life
The New York Times bestseller from prizewinning author David Michaelis presents a “stunning” (The Wall Street Journal) breakthrough portrait of Eleanor Roosevelt, America’s longest-serving First Lady, an avatar of democracy whose ever-expanding agency as diplomat, activist, and humanitarian made her one of the world’s most widely admired and influential women.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- October 7, 2008

David Michaelis -- Schulz and Peanuts: A Biography
Charles M. Schulz, the most widely syndicated and beloved cartoonist of all time, is also one of the least understood figures in American culture. Now, acclaimed biographer David Michaelis gives us the first full-length biography of the brilliant, unseen man behind Peanuts: at once a creation story, a portrait of a native genius, and a chronicle contrasting the private man with the central role he played in shaping the national imagination. Schulz and Peanuts is the definitive epic biography of an American icon and the unforgettable characters he created.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- October 1, 1998

David Michaelis -- N. C. Wyeth: A Biography
An American painting dynasty is portrayed in this huge, riveting biography of N. C. Wyeth.

His name summons up our earliest images of the beloved books we read as children. His illustrations for Scribner's Illustrated Classics (Treasure Island, Kidnapped, The Last of the Mohicans, The Yearling) are etched into the collective memory of generations of readers. He was hailed as the greatest American illustrator of his day. For forty-three years, starting in 1902, he painted landscapes, still lifes, portraits, and murals as well as illustrations for a long shelf of world literature. Yet he proclaimed "the uselessness of clinging to illustration and hoping to make it a great art." He judged himself a failure, believing that illustration was of no importance.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 1, 1978

David Michaelis -- Mushroom: The story of the A-bomb kid (with John Aristotle)
Autobiographical account by a Princeton University student who designed a workable atomic bomb as a class assignment and became an overnight celebrity.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- May 1, 1983

David Michaelis -- The Best of Friends: Profiles of Extraordinary Friendships
An account of seven great friendships explores the bonds of love and friendship existing between two men, uncomplicated by sexual implications, detailing relationships between Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi, John Kennedy and LeMoyne Billings, and others

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- October 1, 1989

David Michaelis -- BOY, GIRL, BOY, GIRL
Sam Simon looks back on the days of his adolescence, when he was one of the first boys at a previously all-girl school, and had a crush on Berry Mansfield.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- October 11, 2000

David Michaelis -- One Nation: Patriots and Pirates Portrayed by N. C. Wyeth and Jamie Wyeth (Contributor)
With drawings and paintings by N. C. Wyeth and his grandson, Jamie Wyeth, and an essay by Tom Brokaw, One Nation illustrates North Americas evolving definitions of patriot and pirate throughout this century.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- February 24, 1983

Madison Bell -- The Washington Square Ensemble
Madison Smartt Bell's debut novel: a story of drifters, outcasts, junkies, and dealers surviving in the heart of 1980s New York City Over one busy weekend, small-time heroin dealer Johnny B. Goode and his alliance of fellow pushers work their trade amidst students, businessmen, and assorted sewer rats while avoiding the law. Narrated from the separate perspectives of each member of the gang, "The Washington Square Ensemble" follows the twisted paths that have led the seven men through the gritty New York underworld and towards a fragile alliance at Washington Square. With humor, compassion, and an uncanny ear for voices of the streets, Madison Smartt Bell delivers a stunning indictment--and occasional celebration--of a blighted New York landscape.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- October 7, 1986

Madison Bell -- Waiting for the End of the World (Contemporary American Fiction)
It’s 1982, and Clarence Dmitri Larkin is working as a photographer at Bellevue hospital in Manhattan. The job offers a painfully clear perspective on a city sick with madness, fraught with crime, and coming apart at the seams. Larkin’s curiosity soon leads to a subterranean world of all the city’s secret dangers, including domestic terrorists with a nuclear device, a serial killer inspired by an occult past, and a disfigured arsonist who just might be the one to burn the whole city down.

Waiting for the End of the World is a gritty portrait of 1980s New York, and an engrossing look at the battle of good versus evil in a city racked with violence and paranoia.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- September 1, 1986

Madison Bell -- Straight Cut
In this story of romantic duplicity, drug deals, and double-crosses, Tracy discovers that the film editing job in Rome offered to him by an old friend is not all it seems.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 1, 1987

Madison Bell -- Zero Db and Other Stories
Presents eleven short stories of irrationality and madness set in the ramshackle South, lower Manhattan, and the Great Plains of nineteenth-century America.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- September 1, 1987

Madison Bell -- The Year Of Silence
The death of Marian, a modestly successful illustrator in Manhattan, touches the lives of many people in surprising ways.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- May 1, 1989

Madison Bell -- Soldier's Joy
A man returns home from Vietnam to his now abandoned family homestead outside of Nashville, suffering from a serious psychological wound incurred in combat. He meets up with a childhood friend who is black, and together they battle against a platoon of Klansmen for the literal salvation of a local preacher.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 1, 1990

Madison Bell -- Barking Man
A collection of short stories, including "Holding Together," "Finding Natasha," "Move On Up," "Mr. Potatohead in Love," and more.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 23, 1992

Madison Bell -- Doctor Sleep
Adrian Strother just can't get to sleep - which is a bit odd, since his livelihood is hypnotism, a trade which this young American plies in the seedier end of Notting Hill Gate. He occasionally works for Scotland Yard, which explains how he becomes involved with a drug trafficker and serial killer.
This was the basis for the movie Close Your Eyes, see below.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- December 6, 2011

Madison Bell -- Save Me, Joe Louis
Not quite at home in the backwoods of Tennessee, and even less suited for the service, drifter Macrae lands on his feet in New York City in the 1980s. There, he teams up with a petty thief named Charlie, and the two hit on a scheme to rob people withdrawing money at ATMs.

Caught up by their surprising success, they move on to bigger crimes. But as Macrae feels a growing discomfort with the increasing violence and danger of their hardscrabble existence, he wonders if he’s in too deep to make a clean break.

With a tightly orchestrated and harrowing conclusion from “one of our most talented novelists . . . This meticulously observed story nevertheless grips us with its lucid prose, its keen psychological insights and the author’s respect for his troubled characters” (Publishers Weekly).

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- November 9, 2004

Madison Bell -- All Souls' Rising: A Novel of Haiti (1)
"A serious historical novel that reads like a dream." --The Washington Post Book World

"One of the most spohisticated fictional treatments of the enduring themes of class, color, and freedom." --San Francisco Chronicle

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 1, 1996

Madison Bell -- Ten Indians
One of the most gifted novelists today turns his sharp eye to the radical lines that divide contemporary America. In inner-city Baltimore, a child psychiatrist, who's successful practice has kept him insulated from the harshness of the streets, desires to make a difference in the world around him.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- November 9, 2004

Madison Bell -- Master of the Crossroads (The Haiti Trilogy)
Continuing his epic trilogy of the Haitian slave uprising, Madison Smartt Bell’s Master of the Crossroads delivers a stunning portrayal of Toussaint Louverture, former slave, military genius and liberator of Haiti, and his struggle against the great European powers to free his people in the only successful slave revolution in history. At the outset, Toussaint is a second-tier general in the Spanish army, which is supporting the rebel slaves’ fight against the French. But w hen Toussaint is betrayed by his former allies and the commanders of the Spanish army, he reunites his army with the French, wresting vital territories and manpower from Spanish control. With his army one among several factions, Toussaint eventually rises as the ultimate victor as he wards off his enemies to take control of the French colony and establish a new constitution.

Bell’s grand, multifaceted novel shows a nation, splintered by actions and in the throes of chaos, carried to liberation and justice through the undaunted tenacity of one incredible visionary.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- June 25, 2002

Madison Bell -- Anything Goes
The only taste of life Jesse has known in his twenty years is bitter: his mother disappeared before he could talk, his father never got over being left, and Jesse’s presence seems only to kindle his father’s anger. Jesse’s talent is for music, which has given him a livelihood and a home as a bass player in a bar band called Anything Goes. Band life offers the opportunity for the dregs of experience (hangovers, mildewed hotel rooms), and the antics of his band mates (all of them older than he is; some of them wiser, some not) offer more schooling in hard knocks.

Anything Goes tells Jesse’s story over the course of a year, during which he finds his life slowly being tempered by the unexpected: by a dad who wants to make up and be part of Jesse’s life; by a female lead singer who suddenly makes the band sound a lot better than they have any right to be; and by the confidence Jesse begins to feel in his own musical talent.

A complete departure from the sweeping historical vision of Madison Smartt Bell’s Haitian novels and the gritty cynicism of his intense urban dramas, Anything Goes confirms Bell as one of the most versatile, most gifted, most surprising novelists of his generation.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- February 14, 2006

Madison Bell -- The Stone that the Builder Refused
The Stone that the Builder Refused is the final volume of Madison Smartt Bell’s masterful trilogy about the Haitian Revolution–the first successful slave revolution in history–which begins with All Souls' Rising (a finalist for the National Book Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award) and continues with Master of the Crossroads. Each of these three novels can be read independently of the two others; of the trilogy, The Baltimore Sun has said, “[It] will make an indelible mark on literary history–one worthy of occupying the same shelf as Tolstoy’s War and Peace.”

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- November 6, 2007

Madison Bell -- Charm City: A Walk Through Baltimore
With a writer’s keen eye, a longtime resident’s familiarity, and his own sly wit, acclaimed novelist Madison Smartt Bell leads us on a walk through his adopted hometown of Baltimore, a city where crab cakes, Edgar Allan Poe, hair extensions, and John Waters movies somehow coexist. From its founding before the Revolutionary War to its place in popular culture—thanks to seminal films like Barry Levinson’s Diner, the television show Homicide, and bestselling books by George Pelecanos and Laura Lippman—Baltimore is America, and in Charm City, Bell brings its story to vivid life.

First revealing how Baltimore received some of its nicknames—including “Charm City”—Bell sets off from his neighborhood of Cedarcroft and finds his way across the city’s crossroads, joined periodically by a host of fellow Baltimoreans. Exploring Baltimore’s prominent role in history (it was here that Washington planned the battle of Yorktown and Francis Scott Key witnessed the “bombs bursting in air”), Bell takes us to such notable spots as the Inner Harbor and Federal Hill, as well as many of the undiscovered corners that give Baltimore its distinctive character. All the while, Charm City sheds deserved light onto a sometimes overlooked, occasionally eccentric, but always charming place.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- November 3, 2009

Madison Bell -- Devil's Dream: A Novel About Nathan Bedford Forrest
From the author of All Souls’ Rising which The Washington Post called “A serious historical novel that reads like a dream,” comes a powerful new novel about Nathan Bedford Forrest, the most reviled, celebrated, and legendary, of Civil War generals.

With the same eloquence, dramatic energy, and grasp of history that marked his previous works, Madison Smartt Bell gives us a wholly new vantage point from which to view this complicated American figure. Considered a rogue by the upper ranks of the Confederate Army, who did not properly use his talents, Forrest was often relegated to small-scale operations.

In Devil's Dream, Bell brings to life an energetic, plainspoken man who does not tolerate weakness in himself or in those around him. We see Forrest on and off the battlefield, in less familiar but no less revealing moments of his life: courting the woman who would become his wife; battling a compulsion to gamble; overcoming his abhorrence of the army bureaucracy to rise to its highest ranks. We see him treating his slaves humanely even as he fights to ensure their continued enslavement, and in battle we see his knack for keeping his enemy unsettled, his instinct for the unexpected, and his relentless stamina.

As Devil's Dream moves back and forth in time, providing prismatic glimpses of Forrest, a vivid portrait comes into focus: a rough, fierce man with a life fill of contradictions.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- April 5, 2011

Madison Bell -- The Color of Night
Mae, a blackjack dealer in a Las Vegas casino, spends her free time wandering the desert with a rifle, or sitting in her trailer obsessively watching replays of an old lover escaping the wreckage of 9/11. What she sees in those images is different from what the rest of us would see. She revels in the pure anarchy, thrills at the destruction. These images recall memories of a childhood marked by unthinkable abuse, of her drift into a cult that committed the most shocking crime of the '60s, of her life since then as a feral and wary outsider, caught in a swirl of events at once personal, political, mythic.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 1, 2013

Madison Bell -- Stories From There (Zig Zag Wanderer)
Short stories written by Madison Smartt Bell.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- May 16, 2017

Madison Bell -- Behind the Moon
"Best known for his acclaimed Haitian trilogy—All Souls' Rising, Master of the Crossroads and The Stone That the Builder Refused—Bell draws on his own experiences with voodoo possession to re-create his characters' descent into a sinister otherworld. The novel toys with perspective—women shape-shifting into rocks or animals; the same life-or-death scene played repeatedly, with myriad outcomes—in a kind of primal storytelling that crackles with dread and desire."—O Magazine

When Julie skips school and sets off with her best friend and some local boys for a camping trip in the desert, she finds herself the target of unwanted, drug-fueled sexual attention. Running away in fear, she takes a dangerous fall down the shaft of a vast underground cave, and it takes two days for her to be rescued. Lying unconscious in her hospital bed, Julie hovers between life and death as she travels in a seductive parallel universe inspired by remarkable cave paintings left behind by prehistoric humans.

Marko, her attacker, tries to cover his tracks, menacing those who know what happened in the desert that night. Jamal, the youngest son in a family of Iraqi refugees living in Julie’s small town, is one of his prime targets. He defies Marko, keeping him away from Julie’s bedside and refusing to fall prey to his threats of violence.

Meanwhile, Marissa, who gave Julie up for adoption fifteen years earlier when she became pregnant as an adolescent, is following an instinct that leads her back to the daughter she once abandoned. With the aid of Jamal and a local Native American hitman/shaman, she attempts to draw Julie back to consciousness.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 1, 1997

Madison Bell -- Narrative Design: A Writer's Guide to Structure
A roll-up-your-sleeves approach to writing fiction by one of today's best writers. With clarity, verve, and the sure instincts of a good teacher, Madison Smartt Bell illuminates the process of narrative design. In essays and analyses of twelve stories by established writers and students, Bell emphasizes the primary importance of form as the backdrop against which all other elements of a story must work. Discussions of the unconscious mind and creativity reinforce other essentials of good writing.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- April 17, 2000

Madison Bell -- Narrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft, and Form
With clarity, verve, and the sure instincts of a good teacher, Madison Smartt Bell offers a roll-up-your-sleeves approach to writing in this much-needed book.
Focusing on the big picture as well as the crucial details, Bell examines twelve stories by both established writers (including Peter Taylor, Mary Gaitskill, and Carolyn Chute) and his own former students. A story's use of time, plot, character, and other elements of fiction are analyzed, and readers are challenged to see each story's flaws and strengths. Careful endnotes bring attention to the ways in which various writers use language. Bell urges writers to develop the habit of thinking about form and finding the form that best suits their subject matter and style. His direct and practical advice allows writers to find their own voice and imagination.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- June 17, 2006

Madison Bell -- Lavoisier in the Year One: The Birth of a New Science in an Age of Revolution (Great Discoveries)
Antoine Lavoisier reinvented chemistry, overthrowing the long-established principles of alchemy and inventing an entirely new terminology, one still in use by chemists. Madison Smartt Bell’s enthralling narrative reads like a race to the finish line, as the very circumstances that enabled Lavoisier to secure his reputation as the father of modern chemistry?a considerable fortune and social connections with the likes of Benjamin Franklin?also caused his glory to be cut short by the French Revolution.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- January 8, 2008

Madison Bell -- Toussaint Louverture: A Biography
At the end of the 1700s, French Saint Domingue was the richest and most brutal colony in the Western Hemisphere. A mere twelve years later, however, Haitian rebels had defeated the Spanish, British, and French and declared independence after the first—and only—successful slave revolt in history. Much of the success of the revolution must be credited to one man, Toussaint Louverture, a figure about whom surprisingly little is known. In this fascinating biography, Madison Smartt Bell, award-winning author of a trilogy of novels that investigate Haiti’s history, combines a novelist’s passion with a deep knowledge of the historical milieu that produced the man labeled a saint, a martyr, or a clever opportunist who instigated one of the most violent events in modern history. The first biography in English in over sixty years of the man who led the Haitian Revolution, this is an engaging reexamination of the controversial, paradoxical leader.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- March 17, 2020

Madison Bell -- Child of Light: A Biography of Robert Stone
The first and definitive biography of one of the great American novelists of the postwar era, the author of Dog Soldiers and A Flag for Sunrise, and a penetrating critic of American power, innocence, and corruption.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Video/Film -- August 16, 2002

Madison Bell -- Close Your Eyes (Writer and Actor)
Doctor Sleep, also known as Close Your Eyes, is a 2002 British thriller film directed by Nick Willing, based on the novel of the same name written by American Madison Smartt Bell. The film stars Goran Višnji? as Michael Strother, Shirley Henderson as Detective Janet Losey, and Paddy Considine as Elliot Spruggs.

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Entered: January 3, 2022

Book -- March 2, 2021

Alexander Wolff -- Endpapers: A Family Story of Books, War, Escape, and Home
A sweeping portrait of the turmoil of the twentieth century and the legacy of immigration, as seen through the German-American family of the celebrated book publisher Kurt Wolff

A literary gem researched over a year the author spent living in Berlin, Endpapers excavates the extraordinary histories of the author’s grandfather and father: the renowned publisher Kurt Wolff, dubbed “perhaps the twentieth century’s most discriminating publisher” by the New York Times Book Review, and his son Niko, who fought in the Wehrmacht during World War II before coming to America.

Kurt Wolff was born in Bonn into a highly cultured German-Jewish family, whose ancestors included converts to Christianity, among them Baron Moritz von Haber, whose desire to demand satisfaction in a duel sparked off bloody antisemitic riots. Always bookish, Kurt became a publisher at twenty-three, setting up his own firm and publishing Franz Kafka, Joseph Roth, Karl Kraus, and many other authors whose books would soon be burned by the Nazis. Fleeing Germany in 1933, a day after the Reichstag fire, Kurt and his second wife, Helen, sought refuge in France, Italy, and ultimately New York, where in a small Greenwich Village apartment they founded Pantheon Books. Pantheon would soon take its own place in literary history with the publication of Nobel laureate Boris Pasternak’s novel Doctor Zhivago, and as the conduit that brought major European works to the States. But Kurt’s taciturn son Niko, offspring of his first marriage to Elisabeth Merck, was left behind in Germany, where despite his Jewish heritage he served the Nazis on two fronts. As Alexander Wolff visits dusty archives and meets distant relatives, he discovers secrets that never made it to the land of fresh starts, including the connection between Hitler and the family pharmaceutical firm E. Merck, and the story of a half-brother Niko never knew.

With surprising revelations from never-before-published family letters, diaries, and photographs, Endpapers is a moving and intimate family story, weaving a literary tapestry of the perils, triumphs, and secrets of history and exile.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- March 1, 1990

Alexander Wolff -- Raw Recruits
Exposes the high-stakes, big-money world of college basketball recruiting, detailing specific violations at UCLA, Missouri, Syracuse, and other institutions

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- January 10, 2002

Alexander Wolff -- Big Game, Small World: A Basketball Adventure

The author journeys around the world to discover why basketball has become a global phenomenon, from the Royal court in Bhutan to the tragedy of the legendary junior national team in war torn Yugoslavia, where he learns that basketball has the power to define an individual, a race, a culture, and even a country.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- December 12, 2014

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated Vault Q&A: Alex Wolff on 'Why Miami Should Drop Football'
This SI Vault Q&A, Alexander Wolff discusses his controversial 1995 cover story on why the University of Miami president Tad Foote should drop the Huricanes' football program.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- March 17, 2014

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: The Game That Saved March Madness
Princeton’s near-upset of Georgetown in a 1989 first-round game made sure Cinderella would always get invited to the ball. A MUST READ for all Princeton Basketball fans!

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- March 2, 2015

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: We Bought a Team
From Writer to ABA Owner: My Improbable Saga with the Vermont Frost Heaves

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- April 1, 2014

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: 3 x 3
From Tokyo to Rio to Istanbul, FIBA’s new three-on-three World Tour showcases halfcourt hoopsters from around the world as the game bids for Olympic inclusion

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- February 10, 2014

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: On the Edge
Sochi is close to Russia’s disputed border with Georgia and to the political tinderbox of the north Caucasus. Just how safe can these Games be?

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- March 18, 2013

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: Pearl, In the Lane, With the Kiss
As the Big East does its last dance at the Garden, a look at the players and moments that contributed to its glorious rise—and the tumultuous events that led to its downfall

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- July 30, 2012

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: Is This the End for Penn State?
The worst scandal in the history of college sports led the NCAA to impose harsh and unprecedented penalties on the Nittany Lions. What’s left is a legacy in ashes, a program in shambles and a community in disbelief

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- December 12, 2011

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: Pat Summitt and Mike Krzyzewski
The two winningest coaches in Division I college basketball history have more in common than extraordinary success. For reaching beyond their campuses and refusing to be defined by their genders, SI honors them jointly

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Article -- September 26, 2011

Alexander Wolff -- Sports Illustrated: Sports Saves the World - SPORTS & GLOBAL POLITICS
In grassroots programs involving tens of thousands of participants around the globe, visionaries are using athletics to tackle the most pressing problems of the developing world—from AIDS in Africa to violence in Rio. Can such projects make a lasting difference, or is the dream of salvation through sports too grandiose? SI senior writer Alexander Wolff set off on a yearlong journey to find the answer

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- November 13, 2015

Alexander Wolff -- The Audacity of Hoop: Basketball and the Age of Obama
With five main essays, fifteen sidebars, an illustrated timeline and more than 125 images, The Audacity of Hoop looks at Barack Obama, person and president, by the light of the game most closely associated with him. The book explains how he used basketball to find everything from his identity to his spouse. It explores how America’s “first post-industrial sport” helped him introduce himself to voters, wage two successful presidential campaigns, and exercise the power of the office at home and abroad. It profiles the basketball personalities around him and in his administration. And it takes the measure of changes in the game during his time in the White House, including a heightened political consciousness in the NBA's locker rooms. Part biographical sketch, part political narrative, and part cultural history, this is the first account of the game’s impact on Obama and Obama’s impact on the game, from an award-winning Sports Illustrated writer.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- February 27, 2018

Alexander Wolff -- Basketball: Great Writing About America's Game (editor)
Made in America, basketball has become a national obsession whose rise as popular entertainment coincided with the ascendancy of new ways of writing about sports.

In this landmark anthology, the biggest and best collection of basketball writing ever assembled, an all-star roster of sportswriters, essayists, and players cover the game in all its myriad aspects: the storied teams, like the Celtics, Knicks, Bulls, and Tennessee Lady Vols; the iconic stars, like Kareem, Jordan, LeBron, and Steph Curry; the frenzy of March Madness and the NBA Finals; and the sheer poetry, grace, and spectacle of the sport.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- May 14, 2019

Gary Krist -- The Mirage Factory: Illusion, Imagination, and the Invention of Los Angeles
Little more than a century ago, the southern coast of California—bone-dry, harbor-less, isolated by deserts and mountain ranges—seemed destined to remain scrappy farmland. Then, as if overnight, one of the world’s iconic cities emerged. At the heart of Los Angeles’ meteoric rise were three flawed visionaries: William Mulholland, an immigrant ditch-digger turned self-taught engineer, designed the massive aqueduct that would make urban life here possible. D.W. Griffith, who transformed the motion picture from a vaudeville-house novelty into a cornerstone of American culture, gave L.A. its signature industry. And Aimee Semple McPherson, a charismatic evangelist who founded a religion, cemented the city’s identity as a center for spiritual exploration.

All were masters of their craft, but also illusionists, of a kind. The images they conjured up—of a blossoming city in the desert, of a factory of celluloid dreamworks, of a community of seekers finding personal salvation under the California sun—were like mirages liable to evaporate on closer inspection. All three would pay a steep price to realize these dreams, in a crescendo of hubris, scandal, and catastrophic failure of design that threatened to topple each of their personal empires. Yet when the dust settled, the mirage that was LA remained.

Spanning the years from 1900 to 1930, The Mirage Factory is the enthralling tale of an improbable city and the people who willed it into existence by pushing the limits of human engineering and imagination.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- June 16, 2015

Gary Krist -- Empire of Sin: A Story of Sex, Jazz, Murder, and the Battle for Modern New Orleans
Empire of Sin re-creates the remarkable story of New Orleans’ thirty-years war against itself, pitting the city’s elite “better half” against its powerful and long-entrenched underworld of vice, perversity, and crime. This early-20th-century battle centers on one man: Tom Anderson, the undisputed czar of the city's Storyville vice district, who fights desperately to keep his empire intact as it faces onslaughts from all sides. Surrounding him are the stories of flamboyant prostitutes, crusading moral reformers, dissolute jazzmen, ruthless Mafiosi, venal politicians, and one extremely violent serial killer, all battling for primacy in a wild and wicked city unlike any other in the world.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- April 16, 2013

Gary Krist -- City of Scoundrels: The 12 Days of Disaster That Gave Birth to Modern Chicago
When 1919 began, the city of Chicago seemed on the verge of transformation. Modernizers had an audacious, expensive plan to turn the city from a brawling, unglamorous place into "the Metropolis of the World." But just as the dream seemed within reach, pandemonium broke loose and the city's highest ambitions were suddenly under attack by the same unbridled energies that had given birth to them.
It began on a balmy Monday afternoon when a blimp in flames crashed through the roof of a busy downtown bank, incinerating those inside. Within days, a racial incident at a crowded South Side beach spiraled into one of the worst urban riots in American history, followed by a transit strike that paralyzed the city. Then, when it seemed as if things could get no worse, police searching for a six-year-old girl discovered her body in a dark North Side basement.
Meticulously researched and expertly paced, City of Scoundrels captures the tumultuous birth of the modern American city, with all of its light and dark aspects in vivid relief.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- January 22, 2008

Gary Krist -- The White Cascade: The Great Northern Railway Disaster and America's Deadliest Avalanche
In February 1910, a monstrous, record-breaking blizzard hit the Northwest. Nowhere was the danger more terrifying than near a tiny town called Wellington, perched high in the Cascade Mountains, where a desperate situation evolved: two trainloads of cold, hungry passengers and their crews found themselves marooned. For days, an army of the Great Northern Railroad's most dedicated men worked to rescue the trains, but just when escape seemed possible, the unthinkable occurred?a colossal avalanche tumbled down, sweeping the trains over the steep slope and down the mountainside. Centered on the astonishing spectacle of our nation's deadliest avalanche, The White Cascade is the masterfully told story of a never-before-documented tragedy.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- December 23, 1997

Gary Krist -- Bad Chemistry
Bad Chemistry poses an unsettling question: How much do we really know about the people we love--or about ourselves?

Kate Theodorus used to be a cop in Chicago. Eager to escape the ugliness and violence of police work, she moved to Washington, D.C., to create a new life for herself as a social worker. There she married Joel Baker, a successful entrepreneur whose edgy nonconformism--so different form the conservatism of her overprotective family of Greek cops--seemed to mesh perfectly with her new conception of herself. Three years later, on a snowy November night, Joel leaves the house to pick up some groceries. He never returns. Kate embarks on a search for her husband--and for the truth about the parts of his life that he has hidden from her. When the police unearth evidence connecting Joel to illegal drug trafficking and a murdered biochemist, Kate finds herself thrust back into the familiar world of clues, surveillance, and guns that she thought she had left behind. But this time, she's operating outside the law she was sworn to enforce.

In Bad Chemistry, literary prizewinner Gary Krist has created a taut story of suspense, a charged tale of a woman's struggle to resolve conflicts within her marriage and within herself. As the story races to its intense conclusion, Kate must face the disturbing fact that her journey has taken her to places no one would ever want to go.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- December 28, 1999

Gary Krist -- Chaos Theory: A Novel
Chaos Theory is a shrewd, literate, and compulsively readable thriller set against the background of Washington, D.C., in the mid-1990s--a city on the brink of economic, social, and moral collapse.

Jason Rourke, who is white, and Dennis Monroe, who is black, are good kids and good friends. One night, on a dare, they drive to a blighted part of Washington to buy a little marijuana. But it isn't their night, and the deal goes terribly wrong. Before it's over, a shot is fired, and the two just barely get away, leaving a small-time drug dealer lying wounded in the street.

Their troubles are only beginning. The next morning, Jason and Dennis learn that the incident with the drug dealer was far worse than it seemed. Finding themselves suspects in a bizarre homicide, the two are forced to flee, leaving their families terrified and confused. And what started out as a relatively innocent moment of adolescent mischief soon turns into a nightmarish, life-threatening ordeal, one that eventually draws these sheltered teenagers into a citywide scheme of murders and cover-ups that may involve some of Washington's most prominent--and most trusted--public officials.

Gary Krist's first thriller, Bad Chemistry, was praised for its sharp intelligence and its deft and deep characterizations. Here he broadens his canvas, creating a drama that explores the thoughts and feelings of two families who suddenly find their lives spiraling out of control. The result is a sophisticated novel of suspense, one that takes us deep into the decay and corruption of a city tottering on the edge of chaos.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- September 24, 2002

Gary Krist -- Extravagance: A Novel
William Tobias Merrick, an energetic young man from the provinces, travels to the big city in a time of great optimism and ferment, hoping to make his mark on a frenzied, money-crazed society obsessed with the promise of new technologies.

The city in question is London in the 1690s; but it is also New York in the 1990s. The new technologies are diving bells, pneumatic winches, and "sucking-worm" drainage engines; but they are also wireless telecommunication devices, patented biotechnology processes, and revolutionary electronic Internet routers. Only the sense of unlimited possibility remains the same throughout.

Unfolding simultaneously in two distant--but remarkably similar--periods of history, Extravagance is a comic, pictaresque novel of financial mania, the story of a world gripped by a terminal case of irrational exuberance. Navigating the perils of both eras is a single cast of characters: Will himself, a young man on the make, eager to do whatever it takes to make his fortune; Will's uncle (and sponsor) Gilbert Hawking, a shrewd businessman with one foot in the Old Economy and one in the New; Benjamin Fletcher, the developer of a pioneering new technology destined to set the world on fire; and Theodore Witherspoon, the cheerfully unscrupulous wizard of the financial markets who promises to make them all wealthy beyond their dreams.

Meanwhile, Will's aspirations are complicated by his pursuit of Ben Fletcher's sister, Eliza, the gorgeous and disconcertingly aggressive woman who is as desirable as she is elusive. Can Will succeed in his efforts to win both Eliza and the fortune that her brother's new technology seems likely to bring him? And can he make it all happen before the general euphoria of the age reaches its inevitable climax?

Extravagance is a uniquely conceived work of high comic entertainment -- an ultra-smart time machine of a novel that proves that both love and greed are timeless.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- January 1, 1988

Gary Krist -- The Garden State: Stories
This first collection of short stories focuses on families, and individuals, confronted and coping with divorce, remarriage, growing up, disease, and death

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- April 20, 1994

Gary Krist -- Bone by Bone: Stories
For the Garden State, his 1988 collection of short stories, Gary Krist received the highly prestigious Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. The reviews were entusiastic. "Smart and tender short stories written with enticing crispness...Krist is a remarkable writer, and just starting," said the Los Angeles Times. Bone by Bone, like the Garden State, takes its characters from the middle class of New Jersey, adding Brooklyn and upstate New York. Children, lovers, senior citizens; salesmen, morticians, college administrators. People of every possible sexual persuasion-including those who are not sure. But while Krist's humor thrives, his canvas now has darker, deeper tones as he explores the loneliness of misfits, the pain of separations, and the uneasiness of everyday relationships. A thought provoking, different, memorable collection of short stories, beautifully written.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- August 24, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Q&A Webinar with Dennis Gruenling!

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- September 19, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Sterling Magee (1936-2020)

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- June 24, 2019

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Harmonica player wounded in knife attack!

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- August 25, 2019

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Don't Shoot Me: I'm Only the Harmonica Player

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- December 15, 2019

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Holiday Newsletter 2019

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- September 26, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: A Blues Harmonica Player in Harlem

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- October 4, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Whose Blues? Facing Up to Race and the Future of the Music

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- September 5, 2017

Adam Gussow -- Beyond the Crossroads: The Devil and the Blues Tradition
The devil is the most charismatic and important figure in the blues tradition. He's not just the music's namesake ("the devil's music"), but a shadowy presence who haunts an imagined Mississippi crossroads where, it is claimed, Delta bluesman Robert Johnson traded away his soul in exchange for extraordinary prowess on the guitar. Yet, as scholar and musician Adam Gussow argues, there is much more to the story of the devil and the blues than these cliched understandings.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- September 28, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Whose Blues?: Facing Up to Race and the Future of the Music
In Whose Blues?, award-winning blues scholar and performer Adam Gussow confronts challenging questions of race and the blues head-on. Using blues literature and history as a cultural anchor, Gussow defines, interprets, and makes sense of the blues for the new millennium. Drawing on the blues tradition's major writers including W. C. Handy, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Amiri Baraka, and grounded in his first-person knowledge of the blues performance scene, Gussow's thought-provoking book kickstarts a long overdue conversation.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- October 15, 2015

Adam Gussow -- Busker's Holiday
From award-winning blues scholar and musician Adam Gussow, a taut, sexy first novel about the summer busking scene in Europe and a pair of wild-hearted young men who make a pitch for fame and glory, finding a girl or two along the way.

Busker’s Holiday is the story of McKay Chernoff, a Columbia University grad student with a harmonica in his pocket and a blues band in his background. Desolate and despairing after a disastrous romantic breakup, McKay decides to fly off to Paris and reinvent himself as a street performer.

What follows is an epic summer voyage into the busking life, propelled by the mad exploits of Billy Lee Grant, a fearless young guitar shredder whose Memphis-to-Mississippi pedigree and Dylanesque surrealism make him, when he explodes into view, precisely the partner McKay has been yearning for.

Burning like a latter-day Dean Moriarty, Bill goads McKay into a sun-drenched, all-night bender, stoked by wine, women, mushrooms, and trains, that careens down out of Avignon and across the French Riviera. What happens next—in Florence, Solingen, Amsterdam, Paris—is a story of purgatory, redemption, and love regained. Hope, in a word, as a modern troubadour returns from his wanderings, reborn.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- December 1, 2007

Adam Gussow -- Journeyman's Road: Modern Blues Lives from Faulkner's Mississippi to Post-9/11 New York
Adam Gussow has lived the Blues life. By some miracle he has also lived to write about it. Whether his subject is a novel by Faulkner or the romance of buying an amp, his prose is as dynamic as a guitar solo by Stevie Ray Vaughan. ?Krin Gabbard, Author of Black Magic: White Hollywood and African American Culture

Adam not only knows the blues...he feels it. Read this book and you will too. ?Shemekia Copeland

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- December 1, 2002

Adam Gussow -- Seems Like Murder Here: Southern Violence and the Blues Tradition
Winner of the 2004 C. Hugh Holman Award from the Society for the Study of Southern Literature.

Seems Like Murder Here offers a revealing new account of the blues tradition. Far from mere laments about lost loves and hard times, the blues emerge in this provocative study as vital responses to spectacle lynchings and the violent realities of African American life in the Jim Crow South. With brilliant interpretations of both classic songs and literary works, from the autobiographies of W. C. Handy, David Honeyboy Edwards, and B. B. King to the poetry of Langston Hughes and the novels of Zora Neale Hurston, Seems Like Murder Here will transform our understanding of the blues and its enduring power.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- October 11, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Little Walter and the Wolf

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- October 19, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Gussow apology tour 2020

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- October 29, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Live Q&A with Ken "Sugar Brown" Kawashima

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- November 23, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: A bluesy harmonica Thanksgiving

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- December 20, 2020

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Charlie Musselwhite interview!

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- January 3, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Looking back, looking forward

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- February 7, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Blues Heard 'Round the World

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Newsletter -- March 4, 2021

Adam Gussow -- Modern Blues Harmonica: Working with Mr. Satan

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Music -- November 1, 2016

Adam Gussow -- KICK & STOMP

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Music -- December 15, 2013

Adam Gussow -- The Blues Doctors: Roosters Happy Hour

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Music -- May 11, 2018

Adam Gussow -- The Blues Doctors: Same Old Blues Again

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Video/Film -- April 12, 2019

Adam Gussow -- Satan & Adam: The Music Will Take You Higher
Sterling Magee experienced firsthand the music industry's exploitation of black musicians. So he walked away to play on the streets of Harlem. Reborn as Mr. Satan, he spread his gospel of joy. One of those he converted was a white kid named Adam, who gave it all up to play alongside this streetwise guru. Satan & Adam is a story of friendship, heartbreak and the transformative power of music.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- December 27, 2011

Robert Ehrlich -- Turn This Car Around: The Roadmap to Restoring America
Our nation has become one full of apologies and Politically Correct (PC) statements. It's time for the true right to make a political comeback. Former Governor Robert Ehrlich has written the roadmap – Turn This Car Around. He urges the American public to make a real change and address (with him) the issues of union strangleholds, Obamacare, a failed stimulus package, soaring energy costs and high unemployment, the race-card, the Living Wage war, bipartisanship and other heated topics. Ehrlich notes thatour education system is not meeting the needs of our children, race relations have been derailed and the family structure is crumbling. This needs to change. There is too much at stake for the country and our culture.

Turn This Car Around is a call to action, and a blunt collection of dispatches from America's culture wars, retold by a former state legislator, congressman, and governor who fought on the front lines. Bob Ehrlich recounts the contentious battles he waged in the widely recognized liberal state of Maryland, and provides insightful suggestions to help resolve many of the issues in America.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- November 3, 2013

Robert Ehrlich -- America: Hope for Change
America: Hope for Change explores the causes and remedies to the seven most difficult issues confronting (and confounding) our culture and country. Tackling complex issues, former Maryland Governor, US Congressman, Bob Ehrlich presents an urgent call to action on behalf of a conservative, common sense political force that will determine the quality of life for generations to come.
Ehrlich tackles the tough issues, including, the role of government vis-à-vis the individual, strengthening American culture, fiscal practices and debt, healthcare delivery, job creation, social security, and national security. With his more then 25 years of experience leading the charge to restore the greatness of America, Ehrlich offers a solid direction on the policy changes needed for our culture, our government, our health, our jobs, our retirement, our defense, and ourselves. A must read for Americans seeking a battle plan to defeat the progressive agenda in time for the 2016 election year!

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- December 29, 2015

Robert Ehrlich -- Turning Point: Picking Up the Pieces After Eight Years of Failed Progressive Policies
Each political cycle, candidates vying for public office warn that the upcoming election is the most important event of the millennium. For many whose names appear on a ballot, the statement is at least partially accurate: their political future rides on the outcome. The rest of us take such forebodings with a grain of salt. After all, how much damage can a single candidate (even a president) inflict given our time tested system of checks and balances?

Turning Point makes the case for “plenty”; Barack Obama’s transformative agenda has indeed remade America – to the detriment of our economy and culture.

In his third book, Governor Robert L. Ehrlich details the considerable damage inflicted to date, while analyzing how progressive policy has made America a far more insecure and weaker country.
Culled from published opinion pieces authored by the Governor over the last eight years, Turning Point is a concise, articulate indictment of Western European style progressivism brought to America by its most charismatic (and dangerous) salesman.

The presidential election of 2016 is a pivotal one. As such, Ehrlich asks whether Obama’s agenda is indeed America’s future. In other words, has the cumulative impact of progressivism reached the point of no return – or – will the next election cycle be a turning point for the return of common sense conservatism?

Those of you who subscribe to the former point of view will appreciate Turning Point’s conclusions, if not the accompanying analysis, while readers belonging to the loyal opposition will find plenty of material to keep them up at night. Regardless of which side of the political spectrum you may identify with, however, all will find Governor Ehrlich’s new book an enlightening, if not entertaining read. Enjoy…

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- February 27, 2018

Robert Ehrlich -- Bet You Didn't See That One Coming: Obama, Trump, and the End of Washington's Regular Order
The 24/7 media circus that follows President Trump distracts from the fundamental issue of what his election means for America going forward.

Bet You Didn’t See That One Coming explains how Barack Obama’s progressive policies helped ignite the ultimate anti-Obama political warrior—and how a neophyte politician’s new blend of populism, nationalism, and traditional Republican policies is pulling a polarized country back toward the right.

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Entered: January 1, 2022

Book -- November 2, 2021

Robert Ehrlich -- Original, Unconventional & Inconvenient: Donald J. Trump and His MAGA Movement
Original, Unconventional & Inconvenient is an analysis of the Donald J. Trump administration and its impact on America’s culture, both party establishments, and a strong but bitterly divided nation.

The Trump years were so full of controversy that many observers failed to digest the meaning and impact of the “Make America Great Again” movement. Original, Unconventional & Inconvenient delves into the historic wake-up call that was the Trump administration—and how its leader popularized a uniquely American brand of 21st century populism.

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Entered: January 1, 2022


Breaking Barriers: Working and Loving While Blind
Check out Peter Altschul's new book. Peter was born blind. This memoir reveals Peter�s journey through blindness as he teams with his five guide dogs to overcome personal challenges and eventually discovers love, success, and happiness. You can find details and purchase the book through his website.

Classmates in PAW

3/23/11 -- Bill Ford sees a greener future for cars.

Check out page 9 or here. Bill spoke at the Friend Center on February 15. (Check this out also.)

12/8/10 -- Cover and Page 26: Richard Morse - Into Haiti's Heart


Read about Rick's life in Haiti, his band RAM, and his life's story.

See also: Richard Morse tweets from Haiti - Classmate Richard Morse, manager of the Hotel Oloffson in Port-au-Prince and long-time resident of Haiti, reports on life during and after the earthquake. See the PAW article in the Feb 24, 2010 PAW (page 33), or read the online article. Also check out this article.


12/8/10 -- Page 14: David E. Kelley Speaks On Campus

Wednesday, November 17, 2010 - 5 PM

For any of you who were unable to be on campus to hear David Kelley in a conversation with Broadway theater owner Jordan Roth '97 about his life and work, you can read the article or check out Princeton.edu/arts and The Lewis Center. This was held at the James M. Stewart '32 Theater in the Lewis Center for the Arts, 185 Nassau Street and was presented by Performance Central. And check out David's Wikipedia page.

Katherine Mosby has several books in print
Private Altars, published by Random House, winner of the Book of the Month Award for Fiction, finalist Discover Award for First Fiction, The Season of Lillian Dawes, published by Harper Collins, New York Times Notable Book 2002, The Book of Uncommon Prayer, published by Harper San Francisco, and Twilight, published by Harper Collins.

Phil Witte's 2 Books are out
The first book, entitled What you don't know about turning 50; A funny birthday quiz was published in November 1999. It sells for $6. If you are one of us who is turning 50, or who already has, this book is invaluable. Well, OK, at least it will ease the pain. The second book, published in February 2006, is entitled What you don't know about turning 60; A funny birthday quiz (also $6). Phil is also a freelance cartoonist (Wall Street Journal, Barron's, and other publications).

Christine Brady and The Americas Foundation in PAW

In case you missed it, the September 27, 2007 PAW had an Alumni Spotlight on our own Christine Brady and her work in Tijuana. The Americas Foundation has been a class service project since our 15th Reunion; quite a few classmates have contributed money, supplies and sweat equity to help build Christine's schools. She was the recipient of the United Nations Eleanor Roosevelt Human Rights Award in October 2005. You can read the article from PAW or find out more about The Americas Foundation, or view some recent construction photos or email Christine.

The Curmudgeon's Guide to Practicing Law - Mark Herrmann's New Book

Check out Mark Herrmann's new book on the American Bar Association website at the ABA store. Read Mark's Bio here. Listen to an interview with the author Mark Herrmann. (10:35) Listen to the author read a sample from the book. (19:46)

Would You Buy A New Car From This Classmate?

That is the question that Time Magazine asks about Bill Ford on the cover of the January 30, 2006 issue. Read the articles about Bill's plans to remake Ford as a green car company that can compete with Toyota. Read about Ford's history and get a sneak peak at their 2007 products. Then ask Bill a question via the bulletin board they have there and return later for his response. Note: This article appeared before Bill the Chairman fired Bill the CEO. Now how do you explain that to your wife!

Steve Norris and the California Supreme Court
Steve Norris writes: "I won the first appeal I argued before the California Supreme Court!! I was really worried about it, but it was a positive outcome for Unocal. My argument has also been recorded on the Supreme Court website." Read about it here.

Go-To Guy Joe Jackson
University of Florida Law Professor Joe Jackson has become the Go-To Guy for both the homeless and local law enforcement who deal with the homeless in Gainesville, Florida. Read all about it.

Alexander Wolff on the cover of Sports Illustrated
The Other Game is a fascinating story by Alex Wolff about a small shoe company called And1 which grew, through somewhat uncoventional means, to be second only to Nike in the number of NBA players endorsing its product. And it's redefining basketball in the process. Read the article for all the details, and check out the And1 Mix Tape Tour and the 15 member And1 Troupe if it comes to your town.

Valerie Erwin Opens New Philadelphia Restaurant
Classmate Valerie Erwin opens a new restaurant in Philadelphia's Germantown neighborhood. The Geechee Girl Rice Cafe is located at 5946 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, PA and on the web at www.GeecheeGirlRiceCafe.com. Read about it in the Class Notes section of the March 21, 2005 PAW.

Andrew Moore's Photos in Green Light Magazine
There is a new "cultural commentary publication for the Princeton University community." The innaugural issue was February 2005 and contains two photos by our own Andrew Moore. They are "Baby Bear" on page 17 and "End of the Line, Sakhalin Island" on page 39. Check them out, and the rest of the magazine as well. More info at www.greenlightmagazine.org. His first book, Inside Havana, the culmination of a four year project in Cuba, was published in 2002. His second book, tentatively titled Russia: After Utopia, is due out this fall. This is a collection of photos taken in Russia over a five year period. He is also the producer and cinematographer for the film How to Draw a Bunny, a documentary about the artist Ray Johnson, which won a Special Jury Prize at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival and is now avalable on DVD from Palm Pictures. Andrew teaches Introductory and Digital Photography at Princeton.

A Moment with Andrea Jung
Read an interview with Andrea Jung, CEO of Avon Products, on the last page of the February 23, 2005 issue of PAW.

Jennifer Schwamm Willis's New Book
The Book of Wizards and Pirates: Swashbuckling Stories from the Seven Seas is Jennifer Schwamm Willis's new book. To find other books by Jennifer, see Barnes and Noble or Amazon.com, or the Google search page.

Rob Goldberg - Renaissance Man
The 2/23/2005 issue of PAW On-Line has a spotlight article on Rob Goldberg. The subtitle: Rob Goldberg �79 produces award-winning documentaries, plays in a band, and coaches kids basketball. The article describes Rob's documentary film-making, including an Emmy nomination in 1996 for National Geographic�s Beauty and the Beasts about wildlife, and his win of the Best Writer prize at the Jackson Hole Film Festival in 2001 for Discovery�s The Burning Sands, a series about deserts. He also still plays lead guitar and writes songs for The Voltaires, who you may have heard at out 25th Reunion. And he's a soccer day and a basketball coach.

Sara Laschever's Book Women Don't Ask Receives Accolades
Fortune Magazine just named Sara's book, Women Don't Ask: Negotiation And The Gender Divide, one of the "75 Smartest Books" they know. The list appears in Fortune's March 21, 2005 issue (the 75th anniversary issue) and puts it in pretty heady company. Other books on the list include:
  • The Prince by Niccol� Machiavelli (1513)
  • The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith (1776)
  • The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, Chapter 12 by John Maynard Keynes (1936)
  • The Great Crash 1929 by John Kenneth Galbraith (1955)
  • The Effective Executive by Peter Drucker (1966)
  • Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis by Robert F. Kennedy (1969)
  • The Best and the Brightest by David Halberstam (1972)
  • The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert Caro (1974)
  • Den of Thieves by James Stewart (1991)
  • The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America (1997)
  • Personal History by Katharine Graham (1997)
  • Never Give In: The Best of Winston Churchill's Speeches (2003)
  • And many others ranging from The Art of War by Sun Tzu (circa 500 B.C.) to Anthony Trollope's novel The Way We Live Now (1875) and Malcolm Gladwell's The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (2000).
Here's the link to read the article: http://www.fortune.com/fortune/fortune75/articles/0,15114,1034780,00.html. See the item below (5 items down) for the original mention of Sara's book.

John Gartner's New Book The Hypomanic Edge
Are Americans rich because they're nuts? That's the thesis of a new book, The Hypomanic Edge: The Link Between (a Little) Craziness and (a Lot of) Success in America, by John D. Gartner, a psychotherapist and clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School. America may be the dominant force in the global economy because we're a nation made of somewhat Crazy Eddies�gonzo businessmen and -women who may be genetically predisposed to take big-time risks. Thus begins the review of John's new book on Slate. An excellent review of an interesting book. Perhaps it should be required reading for all budding CEOs. (It also references Meg Whitman '77 toward the end.)

UPDATE: John's book was reviewed in the New York Times Magazine, December 11, 2005. Read the article.


Andrea Jung in Newsweek (January 3, 2005)
She moved a tired brand upmarket and created a global powerhouse. Now Jung's name is cropping up on shortlists for bigger jobs. Who'll be knocking on her door next? So starts the article in Newsweek about Andrea Jung and her career at Avon. Since taking over as CEO in 1999, sales are up 45% and the stock price is up 164%. (If only she had told me to buy some?) Check out the article, including speculation on where she'll wind up next, in Newsweek (the one with Barak Obama on the cover). For other items on Andrea, see Time.com Global Influentials, Gold Sea Asian Wonder Women, Wharton (Business School) Women in Business, The State.com, where she is profiled just below Meg Whitman '77 (eBay CEO and benefactor of the new Whitman College being built where the tennis courts used to be), Andrea's Opening Statement at a McKinsey & Co Roundtable on China, and a short biography.

       Terry Silverlight's New Book, and in Electronic Musician, April 2004
Read the article on classmate Terry Silverlight's career in the April 2004 issue of Electronic Musician, or view it online here.
And some recent news. Terry's new drum book, The Featured Drummer, has just been released by Music Sales/Amsco/G.Schirmer. It's accompanied by an audio CD of Terry playing the exercises along with his brother Barry Miles (PU Class '69) and bassist John Patitucci (played with Chick Corea and Wayne Shorter among others). Visit Terry's Website and click on Drum Book on the left to find out more about the book. While there, check out his CDs. His newest, Wild!!, debuted to rave reviews! I've heard it; you should too.

Bruce Kone in Paw (April 7, 2004)
This may not be the way you normally want to get into print, but there in an OnTheCampus piece in the April 7, 2004 issue of PAW by Tom Hale '04, which I believe references our Bruce Kone. The article talks about the inexpensive 'naming opportunites' on campus, namely carving your name into desks, walls, trees, etc. Apparently, in Firestone carrel number B-13-H-4 there is carved BCK '79. To the best of my ability to determine, the only BCK in our class is Bruce C. Kone. Now he's got his 15 minutes!

Women Don't Ask, Sara Laschever's New Book, Appears to Favorable Reviews
The book, published in October 2003, has been favorably covered by the New York Times, the Economist, Business Week, the Wall Street Journal, the Harvard Business Review, Glamour, Self, the London Times, the International Herald Tribune, and newspapers and magazines in France, Brazil, New Zealand, and Australia, as well as all over this country. Sara has appeared on CNN's "Dollar Signs" and CNNfn's "The Flip Side," as well as on NPR's "Here and Now" and local TV and radio stations in Boston, San Francisco, Dallas, Louisville, Kentucky, and many places in between. On March 29 she did a live interview on "The Brian Lehrer Show" on New York's NPR radio station, WNYC. The book was one of the leading business gift books in December and has been on the business book's bestseller list. It was Princeton University Press's best-selling title in 2003. Check out the book's website at Women Don't Ask. See also the Princeton University Press page on the book (and buy it there, or from Amazon.com), the Additional Comments page, the Princeton University Press catalog page (scroll down to the third page), and read the introduction. And see the University page announcing her lecture, the PAW Reading Room page from Jan 28, 2004 about the book, read a review from The Negotiator Magazine, from Business and Investing, from The Motley Fool, from Potentials Magazine, or from CBS's The Early Show, or read a conversation with the authors.

Don Albert Chosen as One of Promo Magazine's Marketers of the Year
Working with Ebay as their senior director-business development of strategic partnerships, Don has helped Ebay move into the mainstream of corporate marketing. Read the whole story in Promo Magazine.

Josh Hammer has a new book out on the Middle East
Josh Hammer, Newsweek's Jerusalem-based Middle East Bureau Chief, has a new book out: A Season in Bethlehem: Unholy War in a Sacred Place. This is mainly a reconstruction of events, pieced together from interviews conducted in the summer and fall of 2002 after a U.S.-European-brokered compromise ended a 39-day standoff between Palestinian gunmen and Israeli soldiers at Bethlehem�s Church of the Nativity. For more on this new book, check out the PAW article from the December 17, 2003 issue, or click here to read the online version. (You have to scroll down half the page.)

Catesby Leigh on Italian Renaissance Architecture in PAW
The feature story in the November 19, 2003 PAW was written by our own Catesby Leigh. Go to the PAW page to check it out. [See also a previous article on Princeton architecture, from May 1999.]

See an item on Rick Curtis in the same issue.


Nancy Herkness writes her first romance novel
A Bridge to Love delves into the emotions and daily life of Kate Chilton, a recently widowed soccer mom who makes a devastating discovery about her marriage and her husband � an affair he had during their marriage � when it is no longer possible to fix it or confront him. To begin to restore her self-confidence, Kate engineers a one-night stand with Randall Johnson, a Princeton alumnus she meets at a Princeton alumni picnic. (Webmaster's note: If this is too close to home, don't blame me.) Reviews have praised A Bridge to Love's "story of sexual tension and passion." Read more on the PAW page.

Rene Gonzalez and 'Artificial Life'
Practice your emergency medicine skill on AirMan and SimMan, created by Rene Gonzalez and a coworker and marketed by Laerdal. Read about it here.

Alexander Wolff and Basketball
Classmate Alex Wolff took a leave of absence from Sports Illustrated and wrote a book Big Game, Small World: A Basketball Adventure. He spoke recently at a Princeton Varsity Club Coaches Luncheon. You can read more about his book, watch his move Hoop Dreams, which is at the heart of Chapter Seven in the book, and buy the book for yourself at the Big Game, Small World website. Don't miss it.


Richard Pildes - Election Law Expert and TV Commentator
Rick Pildes made the PAW on January 24, 2001 with a Class Notes Feature about his media exposure helping to try to explain the litigation surrounding the events in Florida during this last Presidential election. Read the feature if you missed it in PAW.

Robert Wright and World Government
Bob's new book, Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny, and his views on world government were profiled in The New Republic (January 17, 2000) and in the November 8, 2000 issue of PAW (page 52). Click here for a compendium of Bob's articles in The New Republic or click here for the PAW piece.

Classmate Charles Riley makes PAW Class Notes feature
Charles Riley II, editor-in-chief of WE magazine is feature in the Class Notes Section of the May 17, 2000 Princeton Alumni Weekly. If you missed it, here is the text and photo.

William Clay Ford, Jr. on the Cover of Fortune Magazine
Bill Ford's rise to the Chairman position at Ford Motor Company was highlighted in the cover story of the April 3, 2000 issue of Fortune Magazine. Two stories covered Bill's fight for the Chairmanship (Click Here) and an interesting study of Bill's development into the Chairman and the person he is today (Click Here). Bill also made the cover of PAW on March 27, 2002. And don't miss his TV commercials for Ford Motor Company!

Andrea Jung Promoted to CEO at Avon Products
Nov 5, 1999: As reported in the New York Times on November 4, 1999, Andrea Jung '79 was recently promoted to CEO of Avon Products, where she had been the President and Chief Operating Officer for 18 months. She becomes the fourth female CEO at a Fortune 500 company and the second this year. She joins Carleton S. Florina at Hewlett Packard, Jill Barad at Mattell and Marion Sandler at Golden West Financial. Click here for the cover or go to the New York Times site, Click on Site Index on the left, then Archives (on the top or under Services) and search for jung avon "November 5, 1999" and access the full article (though they will charge you for this). I'm sure the entire class joins me in congratulating Andrea.